Seven Dwarfs Nursery for One Lucky Baby

25 Oct

After a very long hiatus that can be blamed on house hunting, moving into and decorating said house, and being generally anxious and excited that we are expecting our firstborn, we have a new post!

This room is my favourite in the house, mostly because there will shortly be a baby in it. But also because it is adorable, and we are proud of our rookie decorating skills. We decided before we knew the gender of the baby that we wanted to do a Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs theme, because it’s actually pretty gender neutral for a princess story. If the baby ended up being a girl, we could always play up the princess/castle theme, and if it was a boy, we’d go for a more woodsy look. Plus, I have a ton of Dopey ornaments and collectables from when I was a kid.

Can you tell what we’re having based on the room?

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Mr. C made the felt apples above the changing table. A tutorial is available at Purl Bee: http://www.purlbee.com/apple-coasters/

And I made the bunting above the crib:

The bunting tutorial doesn’t exist, but I mean, come on. They are fabric triangles sewn onto a ribbon.

We also made the wreath on the door full of apples and diamonds (because diamonds aren’t just for girls- the dwarfs seemed to love them). The “I’m Grumpy” throw on the bed is made from one of those cut and tie blanket sets from Joann Fabrics, but unfortunately it looks like the item is no longer available! I’m glad we snatched it up when we did.

Now all we have to do is wait for Baby Arts&Crafts to arrive!

(Mrs. A)

Moose Craft

16 Apr

Since my beaver craft has been so popular, I’ve decided to add a post on one of my other woodland creature crafts. Presenting… a paper moose!

Moose craft

Supplies required: white/grey and two colours of brown construction paper,  white foam (optional), a black marker, 3 strips magnet (optional), scissors and a glue stick.

Step 1: Create a template of the head, antlers, ears, eyes and beard as seen in the picture below.
Step 2: Using the templates, trace and cut out the head and ears from the construction paper that is the lighter of the two browns.  Cut the antlers out of white/grey construction paper, the eyes from white construction paper or foam paper and the beard from the darker brown construction paper.
Step 3:
 Create pupils on the white construction/foam paper using the black marker. 
Step 4: Begin gluing the various pieces together making sure that you glue the ears on before the antlers.
Step 5: Using the black marker, draw details onto the moose’s face.
Step 6: (optional) Finally, make this craft into a fridge magnet by adding three strips of magnet on the back, making sure to put one on the head and one on each antler.

moose template

This is perhaps one of my simplest crafts in terms of how much time it’ll take to put together, but it looks great and there simply isn’t enough moose crafts out there yet. Have fun!

Recommended Reading: Ernest by Catherine Rayner
                                              Moose! by Robert Munsch Illus. by  Michael Martchenko 

(Mr. C)

Mmmm…. Cookies

29 Mar

After making Mrs. Arts’ Valentine’s Day gift last month I found that I still had quite a bit of felt left over so I decided to make some more Joyce Wan inspired cookies. This time it’s a whole jar full!

Cookies
They’re so cute, couldn’t you just eat them all up?!

Mr. C

More Cookies

Happy Hunger Games!

27 Mar


And may the odds be ever in your favour!

My Feltie Valentine…

29 Feb

Mr. C, once again, stole my heart with felt. I didn’t make him anything THIS awesome for Valentine’s Day. At least, not this adorable. I think he will have to post a tutorial on both of these pieces of cute, because more spouses could learn from his example!

This is the Valentine he gave me, and honestly, this melted my heart enough! I was so impressed that he designed the fox all on his own.

And then he brought out this. If this design looks familiar to you, perhaps you have seen this adorable board book by Joyce Wan: “We Belong Together.” He bought me the book for Christmas, and it is way too cute. Babies should not be the only ones allowed to enjoy it’s squee-worthy illustrations. And now I get a felt version on my wall!

I am a lucky, lucky lady.

(Mrs. A)

Post-Holiday Recap

11 Jan Nintendo Flowers

Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Holiday or Festivus, I’m sure many presents were exchanged, much sugar was consumed, and tackiness abounded. At least, that’s how it is in my world! I got out my ugly Christmas dress from last year and sewed sewed sewed! I made this new dress:

A definite improvement on my first dress, but I still think I look like a tree skirt.

I also made some felt house hoops inspired by the artistic genius of Checkout Girl (pictures to come!) and a nerdy hoop for my Star Trek-loving lady friend:

My brother got the pink bunny pajamas from A Christmas Story. You know, the one where the kid shoots his eye out?

"You only need to wear them when Aunt Clara comes to visit!"

And for Mr. C, I did something a little different! Instead of sewing, I painted. I ordered a set of blank Russian nesting dolls, or “matryoshkas,” from this site and painted them like Serenity and her crew from Firefly! He was stunned. At first, he thought I bought them already painted like that, but when I told him otherwise, his jaw dropped.

Firefly Russian Dolls

My favourite is little Jayne.

However, Mr. C had to one-up me by hand sewing me a bouquet of Mario flowers. Most guys just buy them from the florist. And most bouquets don’t have piranha plants!

The work that went into these is unreal. I think Mr. C will have to post a tutorial, because he made the patterns all on his own! I just love them. They are in a place of pride above our Wii.

Here’s hoping everyone had a magical holiday (even though it probably wasn’t as awesome as ours).

(Mrs. A)

NaNoWriSkirt!

21 Nov

So one of the reasons for the lack of posts this month (aside from general laziness) is NANOWRIMO! Or “National Novel Writing Month.” It’s like a month-long holiday for crazy people who don’t like having free time and sanity. The idea is you will write 50,000 words in one month (or 1667 words a day). For most people, a nifty little tool called a word processor tallies up the word count as you type. For me, it means making the approximation that there are 350-500 words per typed page, and going from there.

Yes, I type on a typewriter and it is the greatest thing ever. The keys go RAP RAP RAP RAP RAP when I punch them (and you have to punch the keys, for god’s sake!), and I don’t have to worry about the computer crashing before I have time to back up my novel. Maybe I should worry about a house fire, but if that did happen, I would have plenty of other problems aside from a torched manuscript.

To celebrate this overcaffeinated occasion, I made (what else?) a circle skirt. Embellished with a giant red typewriter and a piece of paper with the words “It was a dark and stormy night.” They are not only the words that Snoopy uses to start most of his stories, they are also the first words of A Wrinkle in Time and a book I have never read called Paul Clifford. I don’t have much attachment to that last book, but I love Snoopy and Madeleine L’Engle, so the words were perfect for my new skirt!

For a template? Honestly? Just look up a Peanuts comic with Snoopy in and and enlarge the typewriter. I’m not doing the work for you. I have writing to do (only 5886 words to go…approximately).

(Mrs. A)

Dining Room Zombies like to dine…on YOU!

7 Nov

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All the adorable zombies made here are from the wonderous book, “Zombie Felties: How to Raise 16 Gruesome Felt Creatures from the Undead” by Nicola Tedman and Sarah Skeate. Pick up a copy at your local library, like we did!

(Mrs. A & Mr. C)

Happy-a Hallowe’en-a!

31 Oct

Hope you are-a having a happy-a Hallowe’en-a!

There. That is my attempt at writing in an Italian accent. I promise there was a purpose in trying to sound Italian. Mr. C and I dressed up as the most famous Italians in the history of Italians: Mario and Luigi!

But we were not about to be some typical, shiny polyester store-bought Mario and Luigi. So we used some power-ups! A few of our die-hard old-school Nintendo friends were peeved that we used power-ups from the newer Mario games, and not some of the classics like Fire Flower or Tanooki Suit, but I care not! We were the adorable Penguin Suit Mario and Ice Flower Luigi! We forgot to make a big cooler full of ice to hurl at our enemies/fellow bar patrons, but it was probably for the best.

Now, rather than take the easy way out and buy an actual pattern to make our overalls, we decided to figure it out as we went along. If we had found a pattern that resembled overalls, that would have been great. And if I had to do it again, I would probably search a lot harder for a pattern. But it all worked out in the end. And Luigi even made himself a super cute felt ice flower, which he pinned to his overalls. It is now stuffed and in our TV room.

As for directions for the overalls? When I was explaining to Mr. C how to put all the pieces together, I sounded something like this:

I sewed a hood out of an extra blue shirt, and attached eyes, a beak and a white tummy!

“Just take that piece and then sew it to that other piece, kind of, you know, together. Down the middle.”

So that’s why I never became a teacher. But it is pretty easy to see how all of your pieces fit together, once you cut them out. Looking at a pair of your own jeans helps too, in seeing how the crotch pieces are all sewn together. (Also: is there a more seamstress-appropriate word for “crotch?”)

Click on the picture for the tutorial he used for his hat!

Sew the front pieces together at the center seam and back middle pieces together, to the point where the crotch meets the top of the leg only. Do not sew down the entire leg, or you will end up with a deformed overall dress! Then sew the front and back sides to each other. Finally, sew the front inseams to the back inseams and hem all of the raw edges (or use bias tape).

For the straps, fold the pieces in half, sew down one side and one end, leaving one end open. Turn inside out and press. Attach un-hemmed end to the back of the pants, crisscrossing up and over the shoulder. Either make button holes, or sew directly to bib. Attach buttons!

Template (and I use that word loosely)

DISCLAIMER: I am not a professional seamstress, and these pants are pretty unflattering. Sew and wear at your own risk. But I think ours turned out pretty well!

(Mario)

The Cow Loves Cookies

11 Oct

When I’m hungry, what do I think about? Cookies. And what do cookies remind me of? Milk. And of course milk is going to remind me of cows. Then all of a sudden out of nowhere I’m thinking about cows eating cookies. Seems quite logical to me, so here’s a craft that’s a cow eating cookies!

Supplies required: Scissors, cardstock or cardboard, pink construction paper, print outs of your favourite cookies, googly eyes, black marker, white glue and cow pattern fabric.

The Cows Loves Cookies

Step 1: Copy and cut out the templates provided.
Step 2: Trace and cut out the head and body templates on both the cardstock/cardboard and the cow patterned fabric. Trace and cut out two ears and a tail out of just the cow pattern and trace and cut out the nose from the pink construction paper.
Step 3: Glue the head pieces and body pieces together.
Step 4: Glue the two ear pieces out to the side on the top back of the head with the fabric pattern facing out.
Step 5: Glue the tail piece on top of the body piece.
Step 6: Draw two short parallel lines on the pink construction paper for nostrils. Then glue the nose onto the cows head opposite of the ears.
Step 7: Glue the googly eyes onto the cow’s head.
Step 8: Glue the head to the body.
Step 9: Find an image of your or your child’s favourite cookies. Print them and cut them out.
Step 10: Glue the cookies to the underside of the cow’s head, sticking out just enough to make it look as if the cookies are in the cow’s mouth.

TemplateNow you have a craft to make just before snack time (or to use as an excuse to eat some cookies). What’s great about this craft is that children will get a tactile experience with the fabric and that each cow will be different.

Recommended Reading: The Cow loves Cookies by Karma Wilson Illus. by Marcellus Hull

(Mr. C)

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